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Revenue Sharing Reform: On the Road to Ohio's Recovery

Appendix I: County Sales Tax General Revenues, 2012-2013

Appendix II: Municipal Income Tax General Revenues, 2011-2012

Appendix III: Township General Revenues, 2011-2012

Appendix IV: County Unassigned General Revenue Fund Balances, 2012

Appendix V: City Unassigned General Revenue Fund Balances, 2012

Appendix VI: Village General Revenue Fund Balances, 2012

 

Parks 2.0: Operating State Parks Through Public-Private Partnerships: This report jointly released by the Buckeye Institute and the Reason Foundation outlines how public-private partnerships (PPPs) are one promising solution that would invite the private sector to play a bigger role in keeping state parks open without imposing additional burdens on taxpayers.  

November 5, 2013 Buckeye Institute Testimony to the Ohio House Ways and Means Committee on Municipal Tax Reform

May 22 Senate Ways and Means Testimony on Tax Reform


May 8 Buckeye Institute Testimony Before the Ohio House Ways and Means Committee on Municipal Tax Reform

Ten Myths and Facts on Transportation Public-Private Partnerships

In the last 25 years, over 30 states have enacted legislation authorizing the private sector financing of highways and other transportation projects. In some cases, states are pursuing such public-private partnerships, or P3s, seeking to make improvements to existing state toll roads, and in others officials are pursuing private financing for new transportation projects to supplement declining revenues from traditional funding sources: federal and state fuel taxes.  This joint report with the Reason Foundation outlines the truth behind 10 common misperceptions on how P3s operate. 

 

Buckeye Institute Testimony Before the House Criminal Justice Committee on HB 524 the Collateral Sanctions Bill

The Buckeye Institute testified as an Interested Party on a bill that sought to open new doors to employment for many people who have served their time for non-violent offenses but have been largely barred from a variety of legitimate opportunities.

 

Buckeye Institute Testimony Before Senate Finance Committee on HB 487 (MBR) and Spending Surplus Tax Revenues

The Buckeye Institute testified before the Ohio Senate Finance Committee and argued that despite the appearance of surplus tax revenue at the end of the fiscal year, now would be an inopportune moment to simply return to the old way of doing business and spending that revenue.  The testimony went on to describe economic uncertainty that Ohio confronted and the need to keep government spending limited in order to allow the private sector to flourish.

 

Buckeye Institute Testimony Before the Senate State, Local Government and Veteran's Affairs Committee Regarding Federalism

The Buckeye Institute offered this testimony on the central importance of federalism to the operation of good government and how states serve the indispensable function of being "laboratories of democracy" where ideas can compete.

 

Joining Forces: Consolidation Will Help Local Governments if Compensation Costs are Properly Managed

This report examines the issue of local government reform.  Given that Ohio has over 3,900 different taxing authorities, it is little surprise that Ohio's LOCAL tax burden is particularly high, ranking number 6 nationally as a percentage of personal income.  The need to find new efficiencies across the board amongst Ohio's various localities is likely     to be a key to avoiding the continued expansion of a local tax burden. Using Marion County as a test case, this report looks at how the combination of public worker compensation reform and strategic                                   consolidation of some, though certainly not all, entities can reduce                                         expenses and protect taxpayers.

 

Buckeye Institute Testimony Before Ohio House Technology in State Government Committee

The Buckeye Institute offered testimony before a House committee on the benefits of continuing to embrace technological change as a way to make state government more efficient and better serve taxpayers.  In particular, it is suggested that the Department of Administrative Services redouble its focus on the consolidation of back room IT needs, that when at all possible, IT work should be outsourced to private sector companies that have the appropriate skill sets to achieve high value, and that Ohio consider implementing a state IT usage audit in order to gauge the productivity of state workers

 

Testimony Before the Ohio House Tax Structure Study Committee

The Buckeye Institute offers testimony on the need to begin rationalizing the Ohio tax code and stop the proliferation of tax expenditures, commonly known as "loopholes."  These tax expenditures, though they may help certain businesses to establish much needed jobs on a case by case basis, fail to make Ohio's overall tax climate as positive as it needs to be in order for the overall investment picture to be seen as desirable from an employer perspective.

 

Analysis of Governor John Kasich's 2012-2013 Budget

 

Six Principles for Fixing Ohio

This key Buckeye Institute report outlines six major principles that Ohio policymakers must keep in mind if they are to help return Ohio to its previous position of economic greatness.  These principles include: not using past status quo budgets as a guide for the future, breaking Big Labor's stranglehold over the Midwest, placing taxpayers concerns above those of government bureaucrats and special interest groups, making certain that government benefits more closely align with those available to those in the private sector, and demanding that the federal                                              government step aside and let the states get things done in their own                                                  backyards

 

Smart on Crime: With Prison Costs on the Rise, Ohio Needs Better Policies for Protecting the Public

Tax Reform for Ohio's New Millenium

Making Sense of the Ohio Estate Tax

Income Tax Progressivity in Ohio

Grinding to a Halt:  Ohio's Tax Policy and its Impact on Economic Growth

Decentralizing Federal Employment:  Feasibility and Impact on Ohio Cities

New Directions for Fiscal Policy in Ohio:  Citizens Attitudes toward Spending and Taxation

Should Ohio Limit Government Spending and Taxes?

Why Ohio Should Not Build High Speed Rail